cirrus clouds

cirrus clouds

What are those thin, feathery clouds called? | Weather Word of the Week

3d ago
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It was a quiet weather day a little while back, so I was scrolling through instagram looking at weather photos when I came across this gem - with the caption, "wispy clouds - cloud emoticon thingy." Well, I can't explain that emoticon, but I can tell you those wispy clouds are called cirrus clouds. Let's talk more about that in the weather word of the week. I'm Storm Shield Meteorologist Jason Meyers, and a cirrus cloud is a high cloud, usually above 18,000 feet, composed of ice crystals and appearing in the form of white, delicate filaments or narrow bands. These are sometimes called Mare's Tails because they somewhat resemble a horse's tail. Cirrus clouds form when water vapor goes through deposition - that is going from a gaseous state - water vapor - to a solid state - ice. You can also sometimes use them to help get a general idea of the forecast in the coming days. This type of cloud will sometimes form ahead of an incoming front, so they can signal precipitation in the next three to five days after you've seen them. Big thunderstorms will form cirrus clouds near the top, forming that big anvil cloud shape. So if you see one of these, it's time to get inside and take cover. And during hurricane season, cirrus clouds form on the outskirts of tropical storms, preceding the incoming hurricane. What kind of clouds have you seen lately? Tell me about it in the comments below, tweet me, or send me a message on the Storm Shield Facebook page. Thanks for watching. Like and subscribe. I'll see you next week. #WWOTW Find Storm Shield elsewhere on the internet: http://www.stormshieldapp.com http://www.facebook.com/stormshieldapp http://twitter.com/StormShieldApp Download the Storm Shield App: iPhone: http://bit.ly/stormshieldapp-ios30 Android: http://bit.ly/stormshieldapp-android