christmas eve

christmas eve

Miles Davis Quintet 1954 ~ The Man I Love (Take 1)

19h ago
SOURCE  

Description

Personnel: Miles Davis - Trumpet Milt Jackson - Vibes Thelonious Monk - Piano Percy Heath - Bass Kenny Clarke - Drums " During a remarkable recording session led by Miles Davis in late 1954, he and Thelonious Monk clashed with such bitterness that the session has become almost as famous as the music it produced. The occasion was Christmas eve and the place, as usual was Rudy Van Gelder's studio in Hackensack, New Jersey. Davis had lined up an all star band. Percy Heath and Kenny Clarke were among them, along with a third member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, Milt Jackson, and Thelonious Monk. The session started between 2 and 3 p.m. Ira Gitler, Prestige's consultant for the session, who was leaving for dinner because the session hadn't produced much of anything, persuaded Bob Weinstock to allow Davis to include Monk's composition "Bemsha Swing" in the day's repertoire. Davis wanted to include it to placate Monk, who was disgruntled because Davis was insisting that Monk not play behind his solos on the other titles. Monk brooded throughout the afternoon, which was spent on rehearsals, but when recording began, he became even more uncooperative. He found the idea of laying out during Davis' solos humiliating, and as he grew more and more disruptive, some rather unfriendly exchanges were inspired between he and the band members, Miles in particular. During the opening of this take one of "The Man I love", Monk complained about where he should come in, and apparently the exchange between he and Miles grew, until Miles, frustrated with the situation, asked Rudy Van Gelder to make sure the entire conversation was placed on the record. But apparently it was not. The musicians knew their work that day was superior and that the tension contributed to the result. In spite of the discord, or perhaps because of it, some magnificent music was made, by Monk no less than the others. " " Milestones - The Music And Times Of Miles Davis", by Jack Chambers pp. 191-192 * Any pent-up resentment Monk held is probably best expressed in his solo on this first take of the recording where creative genius has him disregard the rhythm section entirely, offering his own ballad interpretation against the medium tempo that has already been established. Brilliant.