can you imagine

can you imagine

"Super Duper Alice Cooper" interview with Alice Cooper

1h ago
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Richard Crouse interviews "Super Duper Alice Cooper" subject Alice Cooper! "It's so funny because I don't live in the past. I never sit around thinking about what happened then. People always remind me of that. I'm thinking about the next tour. Whose going to play guitar, so you know it takes me back also. I sat there and went, 'Oh, I forgot about that.' 'Wow, I didn't even think about that.' I think the important thing about the documentary was that we left the uncomfortable parts in. It would have been so easy to edit out what Dennis (Dunaway, former bassist) and Neil (Smith, former drummer) thought but I'm sitting there in the movie theatre with them... they're my best friends, you know... and Neil is saying this about the limousines and all that, and Dennis is saying, 'Alice left me out of the Dali part,' and I went, 'Oh, crap. I did.' And I realize I did. The other thing about the cocaine was... we never really ever brought that up. I said, 'Why? Why would we ever bring that up? It's done. It's over. Let's not bring it up.' But when we got to that part of my life I said, 'We can't ignore that. We have to leave that in.' It is and at the same time I look at the character and think, 'That was the scariest Alice ever looked.' Theatrically it was terrifying. It really looked like some kind of monster makeup and I could see I'd lost twenty pounds. I could see that I really was ravaged by the drug and still... the one thing about Alice was that there was never an off button. There was never a time when if you said, 'You've got eight interviews and two shows to do,' where Alice didn't say, 'OK.' (if he had realized that Alice only had to appear on stage) If that grey area would have cleared up and I could have put Alice in his proper place, that would have been a lot easier but like anything else, when you're a creative character, you always take the hard road. It really was a matter of having to go through that in order to learn from it. I was an addictive personality so everything I could touch, I did to get more creative. It's sort of an addiction. You want to get more creative. I didn't realize that Alice was not the problem... Alice was never the problem. It was Dr. Frankenstein that was the problem, not the monster. Alice never drank on stage. Alice never did drugs on stage. It was the creator of the monster that had the big problem. I couldn't really be him without creating some horrific version of myself that was a total opposite version of myself. Once I had the makeup on and the costume then it was really easy to go out there and be this other guy but if you said, 'Just go up and be a lead singer,' I'd go, 'I could do that, but that isn't really what I'm about.' At that time everything you did was some sort of experiment. I realized in the documentary when I was watching it... there was one very specific thing that I hope people pick up on was the fact that when we first started, whatever I found backstage was a prop. If it was a broom... we couldn't afford props. So everything that was backstage became a prop. If it was a bucket it could be three different things. I was kind if like Jonathan Winters. I'd look at this or that and think, 'That'll work.' Then I thought to myself, as an artist, 'Nobody's ever done this so nobody can criticize it.' That was the moment I realized that the audience really needed a villain. They wanted so much for Alice to be the guy who killed that chicken. Nobody else in rock and roll would have done that except this really creepy guy up there. I realized at that moment, it clicked in my head, that I needed to make this Alice character even more of a villain now. He was this weird guy, from out of space but now I have to make him a definitive Moriarty. Now I can develop him. Now that I see what the audience wants I can really develop this guy into something that is really going to be fun to play. Can you imagine how much fun it must be for Ant...