believe it or not

believe it or not

May the 4th Be With You - Unboxing Darth Vader

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We couldn't let May the 4th pass without a HUGE Star Wars Celebration Unboxing! Today we have the ultimate Star Wars bad guy - Darth Vader Star Wars art made by Tahitian artist Tahe. Believe It or Not, George Lucas was so sure Star Wars would flop that he didn’t even attend the premiere. He went on vacation with Stephen Spielberg instead! Clearly that wasn’t the case, and as you’ll see with today’s unboxing, it has reached nearly everyone and every culture imaginable! Don’t forget to give us a thumbs, subscribe, and May the Force Be With You! http://bit.ly/RipleyMay4thBeWithYou Come back next week for an all-new Unboxing Ripley's Believe It or Not! and give us a thumbs up if you want to see more unboxing videos like this one. FOLLOW US! http://www.ripleys.com https://www.facebook.com/RipleysBelieveItorNot https://www.twitter.com/Ripleys https://www.instagram.com/ripleysodditorium https://plus.google.com/+Ripleys/ Snapchat - RipleysBION ABOUT TAHITIAN ARTIST, TAHE See more of Tahe's work on his website and Facebook page http://tahe-at-work.com/ https://www.facebook.com/TAHE-AT-WORK-134090310087493/ For a full interview with Tahe, visit our website - http://bit.ly/RipleyMay4thBeWithYou His work features themes about how Pacific Islander culture is being influenced by the modern world. Just looking at the materials he is using to create this piece — from the thatching to bone, teeth and shells — you can totally tell his Polynesian background. A great deal of Polynesian art never survived the influx of Western missionaries who destroyed any and all art they considered idolatrous. This includes the better-known depictions of their gods as Tiki carvings. Some of the most common Tiki gods were Kane, the god of creation, Ku, the god of war, and Lono, the god of peace and agriculture. The Darth Vader helmet is teak wood that he carved and added coconut fiber braids and shells. The tusks and the teeth are real—from the Marquesas Islands, where people hunt in order to survive, and nothing goes to waste. Tusks like these are used for necklaces, skin for musical instruments, bones for tattoo machines, and so on. Tahe is a huge Star Wars fan. This piece was inspired by an ancient Marquesan ritual. They would customize the skulls of very important people after death—adding tusks to the jaw and connecting them with coconut fiber braids. To make the helmet, he even used a Marquesan weapon called the head breaker. Much like Tahe’s helmet was inspired by the Marquesans, Darth Vader’s costume was inspired by ancient Samurai armor, but, Believe It or Not, the iconic helmet wasn’t even part of the original design! George Lucas originally imagined the Sith Lord wearing a black silk scarf over his face.